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Unit 1 - What's in it for me?
Unit 2 - Saltland Basics
Unit 3 - Can I trust the technology?
Unit 4 - Plant and animal performance
Unit 5 - Sheep, cattle and conservation
Unit 6 - Do the $$$'s stack up?
Unit 7 - The saltland toolbox
Site Assessment
Solution 1: Exclude grazing
Solution 2: Volunteer pasture
Solution 3: Saltbush
Solution 4: Saltbush & Understorey
Solution 5: Tall Wheatgrass
Solution 6: Puccinellia
Solution 7: Vegetative grasses
Solution 8: Temperate perennials
Solution 9: Sub-tropicals
Solution 10: Legumes
Solution 11: Revegetation
Solution 12: Messina
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UNIT 3

Can I trust the technology?

 

Unit 3 directly addresses the issues of how reliable is the information on saltland management - where do we have a high level of confidence and where are we less certain.


In Unit 3 there are 4 ‘sections’:

 

3.1

Is it backed up by research?

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The development of the science of saltland management and saltland agronomy, starting with Clive Malcolm in the 1950s, right through to the current custodian of saltland research, the Future Farm Industries CRC.

 
3.2

Has it been tested by farmers?

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The role of farmers in developing and testing saltland pastures has been instrumental in the evolution of the various saltland solutions.  This was especially true during the times when formal research into saltland management received little institutional support and funding.

 
3.3

How much confidence should I have in the individual saltland species?

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Salt tolerant plants have been known for centuries and the basic plant physiological responses to salt are well understood.  However, the active development of salt tolerant plants (shrubs, grasses, legumes and crops) and the associated management systems is relatively recent.

 
3.4

Where are the uncertainties?

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Dryland salinity and livestock production are dynamic processes influenced by climate (and potentially climate change), livestock markets and prices, pests and diseases.  The collective impact of farmer interventions to reduce or manage dryland salinity is also hard to predict.